Help for another grateful resident

John Day of Troedyrhiw, although now advancing in years, can remember very clearly how, as a boy, he was made to stand back from the graveside when his grandfather was interred at Saron Graveyard in 1945. Over the years he and other members of his family had visited this grave many times until this  became impossible due to the overgrown and derelict state which the graveyard had been allowed to fall into.

Friends of Saron had, in fact, located this grave some years ago when they began the task of photographing and recording the inscriptions on all of the graves within the graveyard. Like many of the graves at this time abandonment and lack of maintenance had reduced it to a sad condition.

Grave of Mary and Arthur Day as found by Friends of Saron.

Grave of Mary and Arthur Day as found by Friends of Saron.

The situation shown in the above image was, in our view, as unnecessary as it was shameful and something needed to be done. Because of the scale of the task which Friends of Saron are attempting to tackle we have, as yet, been unable to do much here beyond lifting the headstone into a better position and  improving access a little.

Lifted headstone at the grave of Mary and Arthur Day.

Lifted headstone at the grave of Mary and Arthur Day.

John Day had already expressed his pleasure with the efforts which Friends of Saron are making in Saron Graveyard and during the last Volunteer Day on 20th September he was able to come to the graveyard and be taken to see his grandparents’ grave for the first time in many, many years.

 

 

A very grateful resident.

A very grateful resident.

John was delighted to have been able to make this visit. He related some of his interesting family history including the arrival of his forebears in this area from Staffordshire in the middle of the nineteenth century; the fact that this couple had nine or ten children and that members of a later generation emigrated from Troedyrhiw to join the Welsh colony in Patagonia. This is surely just one example of the ‘living history’ which our area is so rich in and should not be allowed to become forgotten.

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About davidjcollier

Originally from South Wales I have lived in Nottinghamshire for over forty years. I am married and have three grown up children and two grandchildren. Having worked in education for 43 years I will retire in July 2012. My interests include history (general, local and family), rugby union, swimming, photography, bird watching and gardening. For the benefit of anyone who may actually read this (extremely unlikely, I admit) please do not confuse 'interests' with knowledge or skill. My involvement in a community project which aims to rescue a graveyard from the effects of almost 30 years of neglect. also keeps me quite busy. View all posts by davidjcollier

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