Category Archives: Latest News

It’s never too hot for Saron volunteers

Our intrepid band of volunteers braved the searing heat last Saturday to continue the improvement work in Saron Graveyard, Troedyrhiw. This included:-

  • Lopping branches off a tree that has grown far to large for this space.
  • Watering the small ornamental tree and shrubs which were planted last month.
  • Tidying up, watering and mulching the stumpery with ferns etc that were planted last  month.
  • Completing the setting up of a small ‘pond in an old kitchen sink’.
  • Expanding the ‘bug hotel’ which had been set up by Willows Youth as luxury accomodation for a range of small creatures.

Many thanks for your input and support to Steve C., Simon, Sheila, Andrew, Steve E., Chris, Frances, David, Phil and John.

 

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Call in to support us or to join in this worthwhile project

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Want to get involved in a worthwhile community project? Interested in our local heritage and environment? If so, please think about popping into SARON GRAVEYARD, TROEDYRHIW on SAT 14 JULY at any time from 10.00am onwards to see what has been going on and learn what the next stage might be.


Please support this project

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The next meeting to discuss the Saron Graveyard Project will be held at the ANGEL INN, BRIDGE ST., TROEDYRHIW, on THURS 12 JULY at 6.30pm. Further progress is being made so why not come along to find out what has been happening and have your say about the future direction of this project?


Troed-y-rhiw & the Great War

Can you help us with information about those from Troed-y-rhiw who lost their lives in the First World War, served and survived or were affected in other ways?


A link from Troedyrhiw to Patagonia

 

During last Saturday’s Volunteer Day in the historic Saron Graveyard, Troedyrhiw we were surprised but extremely pleased to receive visitors from Patagonia who had come looking for a family grave.

Victor Griffiths and his friend Myriam are from the small town of Gaiman in the Chubut valley of southern Argentina. It was in this region that Welsh settlers established a colony following a first arrival in 1865 and Victor is able to trace his ancestry back to a time which came just after this earliest period.

Those family members left behind in Wales included the Days of Troedyrhiw and Victor was very pleased to be shown the grave of Mary and Arthur William Day. Fortunately John Day, the one member of this family that still lives in the village, has been an enthusiastic supporter of this project from its beginning and one of our group was able to take Victor and Myriam to meet him for only the second time. This was, understandably, a very warm reunion.

Friends of Saron intend to remain in contact with Victor Griffiths with a view towards obtaining more information about his family history and its links with Troedyrhiw.

For more about the Welsh colony in Patagonia visit www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-29611380 to find out about some of the impressions which a visit to the Chubut valley left on Professor E. Wyn James who, as many will know, hails from Troedyrhiw.


A rewarding day’s work

The usual small but dedicated team of volunteers made another real difference in the historic Saron Graveyard, Troedyrhiw last Saturday. While some worked on the stumpery described in another post others completed the improvement work in an area containing many graves by (a) resetting headstones; (b) levelling uneven ground and (c) planting shrubs and a small cherry tree. There was even time to give the restored iron gates a bit of a spring clean!
Our volunteers worked from 10.00am to 8.30pm with few breaks and ended the day shattered but extremely satisfied with what had been achieved.
Many thanks are due to Steve C., Mark, Simon, Sheila, Steve E., Andrew, David and Tony for their efforts and support.

An important resident!

Yellow or Netted Slug

One of the residents of the new stumpery at the historic Saron graveyard, Troedyrhiw takes a close look at its new home! This is, we think, a yellow or netted slug. It feeds on fungi and decaying plant material and so has an important job to perform in the recycling processes that are so important in maintaining a healthy and balanced ecosystem. We are very pleased to see him or her!


A Saron Stumpery

The success of last Thursday’s habitat creation session with Willows Youth has motivated our volunteers to begin to develop the area next to the bug hotel and log pile. We brought forward our plans to put the many tree stumps that remain from tree clearance activities in the graveyard to good use. We have begun to develop a garden feature known as a ‘stumpery’ planted with ferns etc. This will be a further addition to the habitat value of this part of the site which is a vital part of our vision of a low-maintenance wildlife and memorial garden on the historic Saron site.


Giving nature a hand at Saron

More bug boxes are now installed to give nature a hand at the historic Saron graveyard, Troedyrhiw These should provide perfect habitats for a range of beneficial insects such as ladybirds, lacewings and solitary bees and also for spiders and the like.


A bug hotel and habitat heaps

Last Thursday Friends of Saron were very pleased to work with young people and youth workers from the Willows Centre, Troedyrhiw on the creation of some habitats for wildlife in the village’s historic graveyard. Under the supervision of Jake Castle, Keep Wales Tidy and Youth Leader Dan Townsend they worked with energy, enthusiasm and imagination to produce a ‘bug hotel’ from used pallets and other materials. A start was also made on putting together some ‘habitat heaps’ in the form of a log pile and a rock pile which will become homes for a variety of small creatures.

At the beginning of the session some additional ‘bug boxes’ which had been made by volunteers were erected around the site.

The contribution that Willows Youth are making to this community venture has been good to see and the way in which these young people conducted themselves brought credit to themselves and to the youth workers that guide and support them. Such interest in their heritage and environment from members of the younger generation has, from our point of view, been most heartening.

Special thanks are due to Caitlyn, Misha, Isabelle, Jazz, Jake, Dan T., Dan J., Alex, Pauline, Sheila and David for making this so successful. Also to Stephen & George, Printers for donating pallets.