Tag Archives: habitat

The work goes on

Recent activity in the Saron Graveyard Project, Troedyrhiw has included volunteer work to reset headstones, remove tree stumps and plant primroses, cowslips and red campion as part of the habitat improvement programme. We are grateful to Tom Bramley and Gillian Hampson of Merthyr Council for their invaluable advice and support.
There has been additional on-site work by contractors acting for the leaseholder who have been testing the ground in preparation for repair and rebuilding of boundary walls which we expect to begin next Spring.
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Giving nature a hand at Saron

More bug boxes are now installed to give nature a hand at the historic Saron graveyard, Troedyrhiw These should provide perfect habitats for a range of beneficial insects such as ladybirds, lacewings and solitary bees and also for spiders and the like.


A bug hotel and habitat heaps

Last Thursday Friends of Saron were very pleased to work with young people and youth workers from the Willows Centre, Troedyrhiw on the creation of some habitats for wildlife in the village’s historic graveyard. Under the supervision of Jake Castle, Keep Wales Tidy and Youth Leader Dan Townsend they worked with energy, enthusiasm and imagination to produce a ‘bug hotel’ from used pallets and other materials. A start was also made on putting together some ‘habitat heaps’ in the form of a log pile and a rock pile which will become homes for a variety of small creatures.

At the beginning of the session some additional ‘bug boxes’ which had been made by volunteers were erected around the site.

The contribution that Willows Youth are making to this community venture has been good to see and the way in which these young people conducted themselves brought credit to themselves and to the youth workers that guide and support them. Such interest in their heritage and environment from members of the younger generation has, from our point of view, been most heartening.

Special thanks are due to Caitlyn, Misha, Isabelle, Jazz, Jake, Dan T., Dan J., Alex, Pauline, Sheila and David for making this so successful. Also to Stephen & George, Printers for donating pallets.


More Bug Boxes for Saron

Bug boxes (1)

Our volunteers have made these bug boxes from pieces of scrap wood and other waste materials. These will be erected this week in warm, sheltered positions in Saron Graveyard, Troedyrhiw. They will give nature a helping hand by providing perfect habitats for small beneficial creatures such as ladybirds, lacewings, spiders and solitary bees.


Another Volunteer Day in Saron Graveyard

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-28 at 12.25.58 16.43.42Our volunteers will again be working in Saron Graveyard, Troedyrhiw this Saturday June 02 from 10.00am. Why not pop in to see what we have been doing and have a chat with us about our vision for the future? The ultimate success of this project depends upon community support.


Young Community Volunteers

 

VolunteerWe are looking forward to young people from the community helping to improve the habitat value of Saron Graveyard, Troedyrhiw this Thursday 31 May. Well done Willows Youth!


HELP FOR HEDGEHOGS

Hedgehog numbers are in decline throughout the UK. As part of our programme aimed at increasing the habitat value of the Saron site a hedgehog house was installed in a quiet corner of the graveyard during our July Volunteer Day. All we need now are some hedgehogs!


A habitat for birds

Nest box

One of the aims of this project is to increase the habitat value of Saron graveyard.

Our volunteers may be erecting some nest boxes during the next Volunteer Day which will be held on Saturday 13th February from 10.00am.

Please call in to see what we are doing or to lend a hand. You will be made very welcome.

(Thanks to BTO for nest box plan.)


Saron Graveyard – Heritage and habitat

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Friends of Saron volunteers give their time freely to continue their programme of improvement work in Saron graveyard, Troedyrhiw. Our vision is to create a community asset in the form of Saron Memorial and Wildlife Garden in which both heritage and habitat can be respected and appreciated.

What are your thoughts on this work?